China’s Xi allowed to remain ‘president for life’ as term limits removed

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionShould China’s Xi be president for life? China has approved the removal of term limits for its leader, in a move that effectively allows Xi Jinping to remain as president for life. The constitutional changes were passed by China’s annual sitting of the National People’s Congress on Sunday. The vote was widely regarded as a rubber-stamping exercise. Two delegates voted against the change and three abstained, out of 2,964 votes. China had imposed a two-term limit on its president since the 1990s.…

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DIY clear glass whiteboard

So this story started out with blocking my window in my home office, so that I could sit in darkness (with a few lights on, obviously). It helps me focus as the light is usually very strong coming from outside and I used thick curtains anyway. So this is how I did it. Step 1 — put drywall in front of existing window. Seal up with silicone. Not getting into detail on this step as most people will just use a normal wall. Step 2 — measure the dimensions (leaving 2–3cm of gap on…

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I’m an Impostor

This is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to write, much less admit to myself.  I’ve written resignation letters from jobs I’ve loved, I’ve ended relationships, I’ve failed at a host of tasks, and let myself down in my life.  All of those feelings were very temporary — they would be heart-breaking temporarily but within months I’d have moved on.  There’s one feeling, however, that I’ve not been able to conquer during my professional career:  Impostor Syndrome. I’m an Impostor “Impostor” is a powerful word but that’s how I have…

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What if the internet connection is down.Do you still productive as developer?

As developer, How many times during a day you need to ask google for something related to your work? How to use a library? Is there a fix for an encountered problem? Maybe the answer is at least once a day. Currently and as developers, the internet saves us a lot of time. Whatever the problem you have, just search the right keywords in google and instantly and in many cases you have a result that matches your need. For example, if we want to know how to read a file…

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Elizabeth Barrett Browning on Happiness as a Moral Obligation

“What is happiness, anyhow? … so impalpable — a mere breath, an evanescent tinge,” Walt Whitman wondered in his most direct reflection on happiness. Thirty years earlier, another genius of letters and pioneering poet of the era made a sublime case for happiness as a moral obligation — even, and especially, in the midst of suffering. By the time Elizabeth Barrett Browning (March 6, 1806–June 29, 1861) became one of the most celebrated authors of her time, she had endured an inordinate amount of suffering — from a litany of…

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Quadrupling Ansible performance with Mitogen

[tl;dr: the Mitogen extension for Ansible exists today and it’s as awesome as I promised, but I want to push things much further. If you value free time, this project needs your support] Allegedly on site as a developer, two summers ago I found myself in a situation you are no doubt familiar with, where despite preferences unrelated problems inevitably gravitate towards whoever can deal with them. Following an exhausting day spent watching a dog-slow Ansible job fail repeatedly, one evening I dusted off a personal aid to help me…

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Webkit for your terminal

README.md Based on nodejs, chrome-remote-interface, and blessed To enter a new url press the urlbar with your mouse scroll with your mouse scroll wheel or pgup and pgdown Status Simpler pages renders and are somewhat readable 🙂 Looking for contributors Please come and help with the project. Screenshot Install git clone https://github.com/callesg/termkit.git cd termkit #Get dependencies ./build.sh #start chrome with Chrome DevTools Protocol in another tab #On OSX /Applications/Google\ Chrome.app/Contents/MacOS/Google\ Chrome –remote-debugging-port=9222 –headless #On linux google-chrome –headless –remote-debugging-port=9222 #start termkit node termkit.js #Your terminal emulator needs mouse support #To scroll…

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Taming huge collections of DOM nodes

How to work with thousands of DOM nodes using pure JavaScript and DOM API DOM is slow? How much more dramatic can you get? In an almost biblical revelation, we’ve learned that DOM manipulation is slow… ten years ago. It may look like things are so much better today, and they certainly are in the common cases. But today we do more things with the DOM than 10 years ago, and we are faced with new challenges. There are still things you don’t get to be careless with. Thousands of DOM nodes…

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School attack in the Netherlands – no one gets hurt because it isn’t the US

A ‘school attack in The Netherlands’ is not exactly the most common headline you see in the news. You expect to see that sort of news in other countries *cough* USA *cough*. But we are living in strange times… This last Tuesday a mentally-ill 44-year-old man went to a school wielding two knives. Obviously posing a threat, the students used their backpacks to scare off the attacker. The man, after being barraged by a volley of backpacks filled with heavy science books, promptly walked away from the school. The attacker…

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Mother-daughter team joins YC to accelerate their drug discovery platform

While some Silicon Valley tech titans infuse themselves with rejuvenating blood in the hopes of living longer, others work on accelerating drug discovery to cure actual diseases. Dr. Monica Berrondo and her mother, Susana Kaufmann, founded Macromoltek in 2011 to assist pharmaceutical companies with the treatment and diagnosis of infectious diseases and various types of cancers. The duo will be graduating from Y Combinator’s current batch (Winter 2018) later this month with $120,000 in funding. Based in Austin, Texas, Macromoltek provides a molecular modeling software to analyze potential antibody drug…

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Ursula K. Le Guin: an anthropologist of other worlds

BOOKS AND ARTS 23 February 2018 Marleen S. Barr remembers a titan of science fiction. Marleen S. Barr Marleen S. Barr teaches English at the City University of New York. She has won the Science Fiction Research Association’s Pilgrim Award for lifetime achievement in science fiction criticism. Her books include Feminist Fabulation and Genre Fission. Her most recent publication is a short-fiction collection, When Trump Changed. Twitter: @marleenbarr Search for this author in: Ursula K. Le Guin used her work to speak out about marginalized groups.Credit: Marian Wood Kolisch I…

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Japanese Maker Pro, five times bigger in this four years

Sales of Maker Pro via Switch Science from 2014–2017. Japanese Maker Pro (Indie Hardware) is grown rapidly. Switch Science sells Japanese Maker Pro Product (Indie Hardware) sales have been five times over the past four years.Of course, Indie Hardware is sold at various DIY events in Japan besides Switch Science. It is thought that the market as a whole continues to grow.Moreover, there is still a possibility in this market. Even numbers that are five times larger are only 0.1 percent of Indie Manga in Japan(Japanese Indie Manga Market is over…

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Age checks on porn ‘risk exposing sexual tastes’

Incoming age verification checks for people who watch pornography online are at risk of their sexual tastes being exposed, a privacy expert has warned. From April, those who open adult websites will have to prove their age before they are granted access, under a new initiative from the government to ensure young people cannot stumble upon inappropriate images or videos. The Government has given the all clear for one of the largest pornography companies to organise the arrangements for verification but experts claim that handing this power to the porn…

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The Olympian Who Believes He’s Always on TV

Mary Pilon | The Kevin Show: An Olympic Athlete’s Battle with Mental Illness | Bloomsbury | March 2018 | 14 minutes (3,775 words) “Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you.” –The Velveteen Rabbit As Kevin Hall stood onboard the Artemis, a 72-foot catamaran, trying to help his teammates dredge Andrew Simpson’s body out of the water, he wasn’t entirely sure if the scene unfolding before him was really happening or not. Andrew “Bart” Simpson, whose body might or might not have…

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Optimized shot-based encodes: Now Streaming

Compression Performance In December 2016, we introduced AVCHi-Mobile and VP9-Mobile encodes for downloads. For these mobile encodes, several changes led to improved compression performance over per-title encodes, including longer GOPs, flexible encoder settings and per-chunk optimization. These streams serve as our high quality baseline for H.264/AVC and VP9 encoding with traditional rate control settings. The graph below (Fig. 3) demonstrates how the combination of Dynamic Optimization with shot-based encoding further improves compression efficiency. We plot the bitrate-VMAF curves of our new optimized encodes, referred to as VP9-Opt and AVCHi-Opt, compared…

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Explained Simply: How an AI program mastered the ancient game of Go

Let’s get started! Abstract As you know, the goal of this research was to train an AI program to play Go at the level of world-class professional human players. To understand this challenge, let me first talk about something similar done for Chess. In the early 1990s, IBM came out with the Deep Blue computer which defeated the great champion Gary Kasparov in Chess. (He’s also a very cool guy, make sure to read more about him later!) How did Deep Blue play? Well, it used a very brute force method.…

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Richard Monson-Haefel returns to open source Java

Most people in the Java industry don’t know me but there was a time when I was very involved with Java, open source, standardization, and the community. I started working professionally as a Java developer in late 1995 and continued to grow professionally within the Java community until 2004 when I left to become an analyst. Since then I have worked a lot of jobs, a few startups, and done a lot of development but none of it was in Java or involved open source. I’m grateful for everything I…

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A better investment than crypto currency: FNGU

Let’s face it…Bitcoin, as well as all crypto currencies, suck as an investment. Every time it looks like it is recovering, it drops $400-600+ for no reason: It goes up a lot for a brief period of time, a tiny number of people make money, and then it crashes and many more people lose money than made any. Yeah, an obvious exception to this is if you bought it in 2010-2016, but that is not most people. Most people came too late and will likely never recover their initial investment.…

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Shaman: Small, Lightweight, API-Driven DNS Server in Go

README.md Small, clusterable, lightweight, api-driven dns server. Quickstart: # Start shaman with defaults (requires admin privileges (port 53)) shaman -s # register a new domain shaman add -d nanopack.io -A 127.0.0.1 # perform dns lookup # OR `nslookup -port=53 nanopack.io 127.0.0.1` dig @localhost nanopack.io +short # 127.0.0.1 # Congratulations! Usage: As a CLI Simply run shaman <COMMAND> shaman or shaman -h will show usage and a list of commands: shaman – api driven dns server Usage: shaman [flags] shaman [command] Available Commands: add Add a domain to shaman delete Remove…

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Distributed transactions and why you should care

If my product succeeds will this eventual-consistency thing come back to haunt me? Anyone who’s ever taken an information-theory class probably knows of ACID properties and the CAP theorem, but most people seem to think that this is a problem that only distributed system engineers need to be concerned about…After all isn’t my database supposed to guarantee ACID properties for reads and writes across time and space? Or you could just be that guy… Why should I as an application developer concern myself with making sure that the transactions made by my application…

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How Someone Tried to Exploit Our Smart Contract and Steal All of Its Ether

On March 7th, we noticed some weird transactions happening on CityMayor. First, someone used our contract directly instead of going through the dAPP. We know that, because a nickname is mandatory if you want to use the DAPP to interact with the CityMayor contract. Now, don’t get me wrong, that’s pretty neat! We are not against people using the contract directly, and we actually encourage you to do so 🙂 We’ve extensively documented the smart contract on etherscan.io so that anyone can take a look at it (it’s pretty short),…

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Did Network Solutions conspire in allowing coachtickets.com domain be stolen?

So I’m documenting this cautionary tale because I feel I owe it to other poor unsuspecting domain name owners and businesses to NEVER trust any network solutions company (web.com, networksolutions.com, register.com), with your domains. Why? Because they allowed our domain to be stolen clean out of our account despite appropriate checks. But I’m jumping ahead. Lets start from the beginning… So I am a member of a tiny tech worker co-operative in the U.K and as well as making websites mainly for charities and third sector organisations we have an…

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Use CrateDB with SQuirreL as a Basic Java Desktop Client

Because CrateDB supports the PostgreSQL wire protocol, many PostgreSQL clients will work with CrateDB. And that includes graphical clients like SQuirreL. SQuirreL is a popular SQL database administration client written in Java, available under an open source license. It runs under Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. In this post I will show you how to get set up with CrateDB and SQuirreL as a desktop client for macOS, but these instructions should be trivially adaptable for Linux or Windows. Install CrateDB If you don’t already have CrateDB running locally, it’s…

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Why Hanami will never unseat Rails

Ok now look. This is an article about the dynamics of the Ruby web ecosystem. I’m going to explore the status quo, what it would take to change the status quo, and why that matters. I’m going to make a prediction: that in 5 years time, while Rails may not be the dominant framework, Hanami will definitely not be. And before we go any further, I want to get two thing straight: First: This article is not about criticising the quality of Hanami’s code. I’m well aware that Hanami is…

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This Is What Happens When Bitcoin Miners Take Over Your Town

EAST WENATCHEE, Washington—Hands on the wheel, eyes squinting against the winter sun, Lauren Miehe eases his Land Rover down the main drag and tells me how he used to spot promising sites to build a bitcoin mine, back in 2013, when he was a freshly arrived techie from Seattle and had just discovered this sleepy rural community. The attraction then, as now, was the Columbia River, which we can glimpse a few blocks to our left. Bitcoin mining—the complex process in which computers solve a complicated math puzzle to win…

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Folding satellites: How origami inspired a ‘space geek’

The delicate art of origami has been practiced for over 1,000 years, but could this ancient discipline play a part in unlocking the secrets of space? A British startup has come up with a novel way to reduce the amount of space needed to send structures into orbit. Oxford Space Systems (OSS) was founded in 2013 by Mike Lawton, a self-confessed “space geek who grew up on a diet of Star Wars and Star Trek.” OSS designs and manufactures deployable antennas and structures for satellites. It has its own proprietary…

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